How Paper Affects Printed Colors

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How Paper Affects Printed Colors

Posted by Guest Blogger Terry Graham on Mon, 06/04/2018 - 3:42pm

Deciding which type and finish of paper to use for a print job is very important and can have a significant impact on the way printed ink appears in real life. For example, if you order letterhead, business cards, labels and envelopes using different types of paper for each project, they may all appear to have been printed using different ink colors, even though the ink color is identical.

 

On coated paper, the ink sits on top of the coating, which makes ink colors appear sharper and more vibrant. On uncoated paper, the ink is absorbed into the fibers of the paper, appearing duller and less vibrant. Recycled paper and colored paper can also alter the appearance of the printed ink.

 

To see real-life examples, I encourage you to compare a Pantone Color Bridge swatch book between coated vs. uncoated paper. The same ink colors appear very differently depending on the type of paper used. PMS colors also indicate whether they’re designed for coated stock (Pantone 185 C, for example) or an uncoated stock (Pantone 185 U).

 

If you have questions or need advice about papers and ink colors, please contact me. Have a great rest of your week!

About the Author
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Terry Graham is a Sales Representative at Western States Envelope & Label. Based in the greater Atlanta area, he works with customers throughout Georgia and Northern Florida. Follow his personal blog on LinkedIn or connect with him at terry.graham@wsel.com


Any views expressed in these blogs are that of the blog's author and do not necessarily represent those of Western States Envelope & Label.





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